As a Contributing Editor for PCMag, John Delaney has been testing and reviewing monitors, TVs, PCs, networking and smart home gear, and other assorted hardware and peripherals for almost 20 years. A 13-year veteran of PC Magazine's Labs (most recently as Director of Operations), John was responsible for the recruitment, training and management of t... See Full Bio
In fact, just this week I had the power go out at my home, which is also where my office is. I had deadlines to meet, so I decided to go to a coffee shop where I could work and fill up on caffeine. It wasn't until I walked into my garage that I remembered I had to manually open the garage door, disconnecting the door from the chain drive. My particular garage door opener wouldn't let me reconnect the door and the chain drive, locking it in place, so I was stuck with a garage door that anyone could lift open with ease.
Never wonder who’s knocking at your door again. With the Ring Doorbell, you’ll receive alerts when your doorbell is pressed or motion is detected, allowing you to hear and interact with visitors. In addition to acting as a two-way communication device for your front door, it works as a security system; you can set motion detection zones from five to 30 feet outside your door. The sensor is quite sensitive, so it’s probably best to set its range and awareness levels as low as you’re comfortable with. If you’re willing to venture off Amazon (and pay a little more), the Nest Hello doorbell is another favorite option that works with Alexa.
As far as actually using the Video Doorbell 2, my experience was largely positive. The video that’s streamed live from the doorbell is bright and has decent resolution, and the IR sensors around the camera make it possible to see visitors at night, too. Connecting to the camera through the smartphone app was quick, even if I wasn’t home and had to use LTE, and the two-way microphone and speaker made it possible to talk to visitors directly. I was even able to view the camera’s feed on Amazon’s Echo Show — though it doesn’t support two-way audio, and I had some trouble connecting to the camera at times.
As far as actually using the Video Doorbell 2, my experience was largely positive. The video that’s streamed live from the doorbell is bright and has decent resolution, and the IR sensors around the camera make it possible to see visitors at night, too. Connecting to the camera through the smartphone app was quick, even if I wasn’t home and had to use LTE, and the two-way microphone and speaker made it possible to talk to visitors directly. I was even able to view the camera’s feed on Amazon’s Echo Show — though it doesn’t support two-way audio, and I had some trouble connecting to the camera at times.
Ring’s motion sensors and contact sensors are much more traditional than Nest’s, which cleverly combine the two into a single device that also adds a nightlight. Nest’s base station also combines the keypad with it and adds even more motion detection sensors – Ring’s separate base station and keypad approach is almost clumsy in comparison. But it is possible to add multiple keypads to the Ring system, so you can have one at each entry way or in your bedroom if that’s a more convenient place for it. The keypad can be placed flat on a table or mounted to the wall, and uses a simple MicroUSB cable for power. Its internal battery lasts between six and twelve months, according to Ring, so it’s possible to install it in a location that doesn’t have an accessible power outlet and just charge it occasionally.
Also, Ring thinks it can do more than others in this space because of its overarching mission, which has focused much of its product development to date: Creating a so-called “Ring of security” that extends across the home and into the neighbourhood. Protect is a big part of that plan, because it deepens the relationship that Ring has with its customers, and allows it to gather data to help truly hone and personalize its alert system and monitoring services.
On the plus side, the new Chime accessory mitigates some of Ring’s app friction. Even if your phone is in another room, or if you’ve turned its volume down, you can still hear that someone’s pressed your doorbell button. From there you can just go straight to your front door, and talk to your visitor in person. Just like they did in I Love Lucy and The Dick Van Dyke Show.

I recently purchased the new Ring security system after owning the video doorbell for a while. I bought this system to allow me to ditch my system and service from a large national provider (42$ per month for monitoring vs 10$)! Firstly, I have been interested in this product and company since I saw Jaime Siminoff on Shark Tank back in 2013. Back then the company was called DoorBot. I like the new name much better.


Right now, abode reigns supreme due to the number of integrations they offer, the variety of security sensors, and the fact that it’s an open platform not tied to Google (Nest) or Amazon (Ring). I would give Ring second place due to cost, and it’s bumped iSmart off of my list of recommended self-monitored security systems. My only gripe is that it doesn’t integrate well with its own camera system. Nest takes third, but I would still recommend it. It’s a beautiful system, easy to use, and thoughtfully designed. That said, if Ring raised the bar on their camera integrations, launches an indoor camera, a flood sensor (coming soon), and a glass break sensor, it might just become the system to beat.
Our favorite security system for do-it-yourself monitoring and home automation is the $280 Abode Essentials Starter Kit, because not only does it add professional monitoring to your home, but it also works as a smart hub for third-party devices and helps facilitate home automation. But if you're looking for something a little more affordable and dead-simple to set up, Ring Alarm is worth  a look.
Since the Security Kit only comes with one detector and one sensor, you’ll likely need to invest in more sensors if you’re looking to cover any space with multiple access points. The advantage of the Ring contact sensors is that they work on both doors and windows, meaning you can easily swap them from one location to another as you configure your set-up. When triggered, the sensors will send instant alerts to your phone, letting you react in real time. While a little bigger than traditional sensors, these come in a bright white color, blending in with most door and window frames.
UPDATE: 1 Year-On. We have had the Ring Pro for One full year now. I've also added two of the chime accessories. I'm just as happy with it now as I was when I wrote this review. We tried to trouble shoot the sound a few times and still have had no luck with it. I think my unit might just be defective in that area. However I still think if this was advertised as a camera only, it would be 100% worth the price and 5 stars. I did have someone point out the sticker over the ring might be the cause of our sound problem, removing it didn't help.
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Even if you experience a power outage, both security systems will continue to work thanks to cellular connectivity. This feature is available from Nest for an additional $5 per month or $50 for the year. Ring includes this feature as part of their Protect Plus plan. Nest’s backup battery will last for 12 hours, while Ring’s will last for 24. With a longer battery life and an included cost, Ring is the clear winner here.
Most of my setup time was spent testing the position of the three contact sensors I received. The magnetic sensors consist of two parts. One part goes on a door or window frame, the other part goes opposite it so that when the door or window is opened, the magnetic connection is broken. If the two pieces aren't close enough, roughly half an inch, the sensor doesn't work.

Great article with lots of useful information. Very comprehensive comparison that really helps people make a wise decision based on their particular needs. FYI, I chose abode for my home security needs because it’s a proven shipping product and it integrates well with other systems. Although the camera quality might not be as good as others, it will suffice for my needs.
I’ve enjoyed reading your summaries for over a year. I initially had my mind set on Abode after removing iSmartAlarm and SimpliSafe (previous generation) from consideration. I had an Abode package all set and nearly pulled the trigger on a purchase. However, after coming across Ring and reading your review multiple times, I ultimately went with Ring. What won me over was the package being offered by Costco that has six door/window sensors. When I priced out what Abode would cost to have comparable coverage, Ring clearly won out. I don’t need any integrations or automation, thus I don’t feel I’m losing out on those aspects by selecting Ring over Abode.
“Where we’re going with it is once we know this, we can then do things in our network which include, you know if someone’s walking around your house at 3 AM in the morning and your house is on stay mode, then we can do a different type of alert or sort of raise the alert level on that camera,” explained Siminoff. “And then we do things like deliver presence saying ‘How can I help you, what are you doing?’ and so really taking that presence and that interactivity, and that pre-crime thing that Ring is so good at and take it to the next level by knowing the status.”
I’m confident that if Ring were a closed system—hardwired to my home network, and not at the mercy of Wi-Fi and smartphone connections—signal reliability would be a non-issue. But we’re in the wild, wild west of cloud-connected smart-home devices. The Internet of Things (ugh—that word!) is riddled with weak links, and neither Ring nor its smart-home brethren can control the infrastructure’s frequent unpredictability.
Through Works with Nest, abode works with Nest Protect, Nest Thermostat, and Nest Cam. Using this integration, you have the option to sync your abode modes with Nest modes or keep them separate. The abode system also offers deep integration with the Nest Thermostats. From the abode app, you can access and control your home’s temperature and create temperature thresholds. The same is true for ecobee users.
Now, on paper, this doesn’t sound like a frustrating process. And in best-case scenarios, the app would load as quickly as what you see in my video at the top of this article. But oftentimes these ostensibly brief steps would take forever. Sometimes my phone would be in another room. Sometimes I couldn’t quickly get it out of my pocket, or I’d fumble with my unlock code. But worst of all, sometimes the video chat screen would take an eternity to load.

The Ring Video Doorbell Pro offers almost everything you'd want in a smart doorbell. It's fairly easy to install, sports a slender design with interchangeable faceplates, and delivers sharp 1080p video day and night. As with the August Doorbell Cam Pro, the Ring Pro uses pre-buffering technology to show you what transpired prior to a motion trigger, and lets you view live video on an id="354749">Amazon Echo Show device using Alexa voice commands.
“We had this pretty much set out, but because we got sued by ADT, because we’re doing something so competitive to them that they had to try to step in our way, which I think is a complement, it released a lot of information about this. I believe that’s why you saw a half-baked announcement that came from a competitor that didn’t even have full pricing and shipping dates on everything. I think it was kind of the opposite; it’s amazing that a competitor that size is reacting to us, and I’ll take that as a complement, too.”

Most of my setup time was spent testing the position of the three contact sensors I received. The magnetic sensors consist of two parts. One part goes on a door or window frame, the other part goes opposite it so that when the door or window is opened, the magnetic connection is broken. If the two pieces aren't close enough, roughly half an inch, the sensor doesn't work.
When it's time to pair the keypad, the Ring app will have you create a four-digit PIN for arming and disarming the system. If you choose to have professional monitoring, you'll need to also come up with a verbal password to help identify you in case you have to talk to a dispatcher. As a reviewer — and a person who has tripped  countless alarms in the last few months — I also appreciate that there's a seven-day trial period before professional monitoring becomes active, so you can take time to set up the system without worrying about false alarms. It also gives you time to register the alarm so that you do not incur any fees.
I opened the app, tapped Set Up Device, selected Doorbells, and selected the Pro from the list of choices. I named the device, entered my address (optional), and hit Continue. At this point you can play an instructional video if you're having difficulty. Next I was asked what type of bell my existing doorbell uses (mechanical, digital, none) and was prompted to press and release the button on the side of the Pro, at which point a voice informed me that I was entering setup mode. I hit Continue and was prompted to navigate to my phone's Wi-Fi settings and connect to the Ring network. I returned to the app and selected my home Wi-Fi SSID, entered my password, and waited around 20 seconds before the doorbell was connected. I attached the faceplate and was finished.
Despite this, we now pay the $3 a month required to save our online footage - when it captures. We're out of the return window due to our many attempts to fix the device through Ring support. If I could do it over, I'd be tempted to send it back and try another brand. Everything else in our house gets a killer signal, so why this device can't get a signal from our router that's only 15 feet away is beyond me.
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