It’s worth noting that my Wi-Fi network is based on a Linksys 802.11ac router that’s connected to a Linksys Wi-Fi range extender located about 10 feet from the Ring doorbell (albeit separated by a thick exterior wall). I spent a significant amount of time with Ring’s operations director to fix connectivity problems in the early stages of testing, but even this wasn’t enough to solve all the performance issues. My Wi-Fi is dual-band, supporting both 2.4- and 5GHz, but Ring uses the 2.4GHz band via 802.11b/g/n support.

In February 2018 at 2AM Ring came in handy. I received the "Motion Detected" alert on my phone and saw an unknown, adult, male, holding a large black object near his side, walking up my driveway, and towards my front door. The male looked directly at the Ring, stopped, turned around, walked back into the street, got into a vehicle and left. I like to believe Ring deterred this guy from committing a crime. After that moment I remembered I never did an Amazon review for Ring. So here it is. Do yourself and/or family a favor and get the Ring. Peace of mind and makes life easier. SEE ATTACHED PICTURES FOR DETAILS.

At 4.5 by 1.8 by 0.8 inches (HWD), the Ring Pro is slimmer and looks more like a traditional doorbell than the August Doorbell Cam Pro, the RemoBell, and the original Ring. It comes with four interchangeable faceplates (black, bronze, nickel, and white) to match the exterior of your home, a screwdriver, mounting screws and anchors, a Pro Power Kit for connecting to an existing chime box in case your existing doorbell wiring does not provide enough power, extension wires, and illustrated instructions. Ring also sells a battery-powered model, the Video Doorbell 2.
I installed a motion sensor inside a shed in my backyard (shed has a tin metal roof) and I kept getting a false alarm daily usually around 1 or 2pm; Ring informed me that their motion sensors use infrared technology and that excessive heat could cause a false trigger. They told me a contact sensor at the shed’s door should do the job and that’s what I will be doing next.
I set up the new system with ease. It Took about 45 minutes! I have to give props to Mr. Siminoff for adding in this 7 day training period which allowed me to learn the new equipment without the fear of having the authorities show up. Thank God someone is thinking outside the box. My last alarm system that was much more expensive and hardwired, came with no training at all and no grace period for learning. As a result, I set it off multiple times by mistake and actually got a fine from my town because the cops showed up to the false alarm. That said, this was a much better initial experience.
You’ll need to connect the Pro to a doorbell transformer that supplies 16- to 24 volts of AC power. If your home already has a wired doorbell, it’s probably at this voltage, but you’ll need to check. And not every home has doorbell wiring. If yours doesn’t then you’ll need to install power at your porch (or get an electrician to do it) if you want to use this.
You can add additional Ring door/window sensors and motion sensors to scale up the system as needed; the kit also works with a FirstAlert smoke and carbon monoxide detector. But that's about it, for now. Ring plans to add additional sensors at a later date and has hinted at upcoming partnerships with major third-party platforms like Alexa and Google Assistant. But considering Amazon bought Ring back in February, this system should really already work with Alexa and the Amazon Cloud Cam (it doesn't).
It doesn't work with the Amazon Cloud Cam indoor home security camera, either. Here's what a Ring spokesperson had to say about it: "Ring Alarm does not work with Amazon Cloud Cam at this time. While I can't comment on the roadmap at this time, what I can tell you is that we will make product decisions based on what will best empower Neighbors with an affordable, effective way to monitor their homes."

My Wi-Fi problems notwithstanding, both the doorbell and chime accessory were easy to pair with my wireless network. Just a word of caution: If you’re using a Wi-Fi range extender, make sure to pair the doorbell outside your house, right on your doorstep. This will ensure that Ring finds the extender, and not your router. If you pair the doorbell inside your home, you run the risk of pairing it with your main Wi-Fi router, especially if your router and range extender have different names.

Installing the actual ring was even easier. I was able to drill into grout lines between stones so I had that going for me. The hook up was super easy, two wires from the house connect to the two connectors on the Ring – doesn’t even matter which is which. Nice and easy. I will have to work out something to cover the shimmed side, but I’ll work something out.
Ring's $199 Z-Wave-enabled Alarm Security Kit is so simple you might overlook it at first. The system includes a base station, a keypad, a door/window sensor, a motion sensor and a Z-Wave range extender. It's all basic hardware with basic functionality -- you won't find any fancy features here -- but the Security Kit is super simple to set up and monitor in the Ring mobile app. 
You can also disarm the system from the app, but in a break from convention, Ring does not offer a key fob for arming and disarming the system. Geofencing that would automatically arm and disarm when you leave and return isn’t supported either. Harris said those were conscious design decisions. “What it came to was security,” Harris said. People said ‘Hey, I want this to automatically disarm my security system when I get close.’ The question then becomes: How close? And is it really you with your phone? Or did someone pick it up at the park, find your address, drive to your house, and let themselves in?”
Once you're logged in, follow the straightforward prompts to connect each accessory. This was one of the easiest security system setups I've ever encountered; literally pull the battery tab on the battery-powered door/window sensor and motion sensor and plug in the base station, the keypad and the Z-Wave range extender, and they automatically connect to the app.
The Nest Guard motion sensor can detect motion within a 90° field of view up to 10 feet away. It also includes tamper detection as well as a proximity sensor (wakes on approach) and will let you know if it’s moved or if someone tries to jam your signal. However, in testing, I found that none of the promised tamper sensors worked. I did not test jamming detection.
After I finished installing this device I found myself having issues with it for the first 3 days where sensors will go offline for no reason almost every day; suddenly after day 4 maybe, all of the issues disappeared and the system was now working like a well-oiled machine. I reached out to Ring support team and they informed me that there was an automatic update that the brain device was going to perform on its own and that would solve all of the issues I was experiencing. They were indeed 100% correct, after just a few days the system was doing exactly what it was supposed to be doing all along. No issues, no dropped devices, a happy customer here now. If you end up choosing this system and experience issues during the first 3-4 days, please wait a few days for your system to automatically update itself to the latest software and you’ll see the issues magically go away.
The real failure of this device is its “motion detection”. To illustrate, I’ve attached photos and video. It goes off about every 5 minutes (leaving battery life that lasts 3 days), even for things across the street, even though it’s supposed to have a 5’ range (also attached). The kicker is that it Doesn’t actually catch people coming up to the door. It only shows me coming in our out about 1 in 10 times. I even thought about making a video to show this, but it’s not worth my time for this Piece of junk. Bottom line:
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